Passanda Curry

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Passanda Curry (Sliced Beef)
The word passando means a thin slice of meat, usually beef or veal, although lamb is also sometimes used. Prepared like this, a simple piece of meat is transformed into a lavish dish. The curry is ideal for any occasion, and is best served with mint rata (pl52) and rot or man. A less expensive cut of beef or veal can be used, as long as it is very lean and tender.
Cuisine Pakistani
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Passive Time 2-3 hours
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Cuisine Pakistani
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Passive Time 2-3 hours
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Cut the beef into 1/4-in (5-mm) slices. With a meat mallet, beat the slices until they are even thinner. Mix together the yogurt, spices, and salt to taste. Add the slices of beef and turn to coat with the spiced yogurt. Leave to marinate for 2-3 hours.
  2. Heat the oil in a saucepan, add the onions, and cook until lightly browned. Stir in the garlic and ginger pastes, then immediately add the tomato. Stir for a few minutes. Add the marinated beef with all the spiced yogurt. Stir around for 1 minute, then put the lid on the saucepan and turn the heat to low. Cook for 15-20 minutes or until the beef is very tender.
  3. Remove the lid and stir for a few more minutes or until the oil separates out. Stir in 1/4 cup of the chopped cilantro. Garnish with the remaining chopped cilantro and serve.
Recipe Notes

The curry can be made in advance (it's good for freezing) and reheated in the pan over low heat or in a microwave.

17-06-07: Beef 644 g, onion 308 g, tomatoes 143 g; yield: 1299 g, packaged as 212 + 208 + 210 + 212 + 218 + 215 (scale values don't add up).

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Karljürgen Feuerherm
I completed a BMath at the University of Waterloo in 1984 and was employed as an analyst/programmer by Domtar Fine Papers until 1988, when I returned to Waterloo to complete an MDiv at Waterloo Lutheran Seminary. Upon graduation, I enrolled for a general graduate year, and then pursued at PhD (2004) in Akkadian Language and Literature at the University of Toronto. I am presently a full time tenured faculty member with Wilfrid Laurier University's Department of History, for whom I teach Ancient Near East and Digital Humanities.

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